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Community Services > Alcohol & Drug Treatment > Glossary of Terms

Glossary of Terms

 

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ADATSA - Alcoholism and Drug Addiction Treatment Support Act

adolescent/youth outpatient - (see outpatient treatment). A state certified non-residential program, which provides chemical dependency assessments, and an alcohol/drug free counseling program for adolescents and young adults ages 12 - 20. Clients under the age of 12 may also be served with the approval of the DBHR contract manager. Collateral and family support services may also be provided to family members of youth clients.

adolescent pregnant and postpartum - These youth are eligible for all substance abuse treatment services available for the adolescent population in general, as well as some specialized services for pregnant women. Those who may require detoxification/stabilization are assessed through ADATSA centers.

adolescent/youth residential (inpatient) - (see residential treatment).

adult - Age 18 or over. (By acquiring an exception to policy, those who are aged 18-20 may be classified as Adolescent/Youth

advocacy - The staff supports and advocates for the client in various situations, including employment, family, and the court system.

aftercare - Program designed to provide ongoing recovery support. Focuses on refusal skills/relapse prevention skills to maintain sobriety.

aging blind and disabled (ABD Medical Program) - The Aged, Blind and Disabled (ABD) Medical Program; formerly known as the Disability Lifeline Program and the General Assistance Unemployable (GAU) Program.  Once approved, you will get a services card.  You can use it to get medical care; you can use your services card to go to any medical provider who will accept DSHS Medical payments. 

assessment (and referral) services - Assessments, screening, referral and case management (monitoring) of indigent or low income clients seeking assistance as a result of incapacity due to alcoholism and/or drug addiction.

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case management (monitoring) - Case Managers work with both adults and adolescents, and serve as a consistent person in their lives as they move through treatment and recovery. They involve the clients family, address barriers to treatment, facilitate access to other services needed, maintain clear and accurate records, and troubleshoot any client concerns.

CHOICES - Community Health Outreach in a Caring Environment. Provides alcohol and drug treatment to people living with HIV/AIDS/Hepatitis "C". Provides education and individualized treatment in client's homes or in community locations where they feel safe and supported.

CPI - Clothing and Personal Incidentals. Allowance and the cost of care while in residential treatment.

crisis stabilization - (see youth crisis stabilization)

crisis residential center - (see DCFS).

CSO - Community Service Office. (see TANF, Work First). The incapacity specialist screens and refers new applicants as appropriate for ADATSA assessment, determines program eligibility and clients choice of program, arranges, refers and pays for mental/physical evaluations as needed for ADATSA applicants, and assumes overall responsibility for ADATSA case coordination, including between financial services and the assessment center.

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D

DBHR - Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, Olympia WA, Toll Free 1-877-301-4557.

DCFS - Division of Children and Family Services [a division of Washington State Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS)] administers a number of programs to assist families in conflict.

deferred prosecution/Department of Licensing - The DOL & Deferred Prosecution program satisfies the requirements of the State of Washington for individuals who have been assessed as having a significant problem with alcohol and/or other drugs, and who require education and treatment to satisfy driving related offenses. The program may also accommodate Oregon Levels I, II, and III.

detoxification - (detoxification; youth detoxification). Care and treatment, of persons intoxicated or incapacitated by alcohol or drugs during the period in which the person recovers from the transitory effects of acute intoxication.

Acute Detoxification - Detoxification service to individuals for whom the consequences of withdrawal merit assistance from medical and/or nursing personnel.

Sub-Acute Detoxification - Prescription medication is not provided for the management of withdrawal, and service is provided in a supportive home-like environment.

differential diagnosis treatment - (see residential treatment).

DSHS - Washington State Department of Social and Health Services.

dual diagnosis - An individual demonstrating significant psychological problems, as well as being currently addicted to alcohol or other drugs. [Formerly known as, MICA (Mentally Ill Chemically Addicted)].

DUI assessment - Designed to evaluate and assess clients' involvement with alcohol and/or drugs, and to recommend an appropriate course of action. Usually by court order and resulting from an arrest for driving under the influence, or having actual physical control of a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs.Assistance provided to intoxicated persons in the streets, and other public places.

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ETP - Exception to Policy

extended care treatment (recovery house) - (see residential treatment).

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First Steps Maternity Case Management - Includes referral to treatment, prenatal and postpartum medical care, maternity support services, safe housing, food, transportation, child care, dental, and family planning. This is a Medicaid service which provides uninterrupted insurance coverage through sixty days after delivery when income is at or below 185% of the Federal Poverty Level.

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IDU outreach - Active identification of Injection Drug Users who are potential clients, to provide HIV/AIDS/Hepatitis "C" risk reduction information and materials, and other pre-treatment services.

Inpatient treatment - (see residential treatment).

Intensive Outpatient Treatment - (see also ADATSA outpatient; outpatient treatment). A concentrated, nonresidential program of individual and group counseling, education, and activities for detoxified alcoholics and addicts and their families.

interim services - Services that are provided until an individual is admitted to a substance abuse treatment program. The services are to reduce the adverse health effects of such abuse, promote the health of the individual, and reduce the risk of the transmission of disease.

interpreter services - The CSO will inform the assessment center that an interpreter is needed. The assessment center will contact DBHR Interprete Services, (360) 438-8499.

ITA involuntary commitment services - (ITA) Involuntary Treatment Act. (see Pioneer Center North (PCN) ; Pioneer Center East (PCE) ; or long-term residential treatment). Arranging for the mandatory placement in a treatment facility of an individual who is incapacitated or gravely disabled by alcohol or other drugs.

The Revised Code of Washington (RCW) 70.96A. 140 authorizes a designated county chemical dependency specialist to investigate and evaluate specific facts alleging that a person is incapacitated as a result of chemical dependency. If it is determined that the facts are reliable and credible, the specialist may (see Long Term Residential Treatment) file a petition for commitment of such a person with the superior or district court.

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John Owens Recovery House - (see residential treatment). Offers a transitional treatment program which incorporates an holistic approach that is designed to enhance the recovery process while preparing the client to reenter the job market and ultimately retum to independent living. Stress's the individual's ability to change his/her behavior.

juvenile - According to the juvenile court system: juvenile may be up to, but not excluding 18 years of age. The courts may extend the range up to 21 years.

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long term residential treatment - (see residential treatment; ITA involuntary commitment). Care and treatment on a long-term basis (90 days or more) in a residential setting with personal care services for alcoholics and addicts with impaired self maintenance capabilities needing personal guidance and assistance to maintain abstinence and good health, under or in lieu of involuntary commitment of alcoholics.

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MAA - Medical Assistance Administration

maternity case management - (see First Steps Maternity Case Management). An outreach program that provides maternity and health care to low-income women, infants, and children.

men's services - Services that are provided to men only.

methadone - (see opiate substitution treatment). A synthetic, psychoactive, narcotic (opium or any of its derivatives i.e., heroin, morphine, codeine) drug that is more potent than morphine, but less rapidly addicting. It is induced orally to supplant heroin, etc., in opiate dependency treatment.

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opiate substitution treatment - A non-residential (see outpatient treatment) treatment program which includes the use of methadone (or other drugs approved by the department) as a substitute for opiates, in addition to counseling and other types of therapy for opiate addicts and their families.

outpatient treatment - Individual and group treatment services of varying duration and intensity according to a prescribed plan. It is a state certified non-residential program which provides chemical dependency assessments, and an alcohol/drug free counseling program for adolescents and adults. Collateral and family support services may also be offered.

Outpatient programs for adolescents/youth are designed to diagnos, stabilize, counsel, and build family and social support systems, which promote abstinence and growth. Services shall include treatment for the misuse of alcohol and/or other drugs as well as for addiction.

outreach services - Initiating discussion with youth or adults regarding alcohol and other drugs, possible consequences of usage, and education/information about services and resources for those affected by their own dependency, or by that of significant people in their lives.

outstation counselors - (see CSO, TANF, Work First). State certified chemical dependence professionals stationed at the CSO, Juvenile Court, or DCFS.

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PACT - Program of Assertive Community Treatment. Provides outreach and community based, intensive case management.

parenting - (see pregnant and parenting). Is defined as: a woman with children 17 years old or less who are in her physical custody. Also includes those attempting to regain custody of their children who are in the custody of DSHS. Youth through age 20 who are enrolled in school are considered dependents.

Pioneer Center North (PCN) - A private, non-profit chemical dependency treatment facility, under contract with DBHR and the Mental Health Division. It is located in Sedro Wooley, WA. PCN provides treatment for involuntarily committed (ITA) individuals, and for those who are of dual diagnosis.

Pioneer Center East (PCE) - A private, non-profit chemical dependency treatment facility, under contract with DASA and the Mental Health Division. It is located in Spokane, WA. PCE provides treatment for involuntarily committed (ITA) individuals, and for those who are of dual diagnosis.

postpartum - Up to one year post delivery or termination of pregnancy.

pregnant and parenting (postpartum) - (see adolescent pregnant and postpartum). Treatment services for low-income, chemically dependent pregnant, and post partum women. Those who abuse chemicals may also be eligible. This is DBHR and ADATSA funded. If applying for ADATSA the request must go through the CSO.

protective payee (pp) - For ADASTA shelter recipients in independent housing the protective payee shall be an agency under contract with the department to provide Protective Payee services. For ADATSA outpatient clients the protective payee is the treatment provider.

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referring a youth to treatment - (see the Directory of Certified Chemical Dependency Treatment Service in Washington State, a.k.a., "The Green Book," section M, p. M-).

residential treatment - A residential program consists of a combination of education, individual therapy, group therapy, and related activities for detoxified alcoholics, addicts, and their families.

adult - Can be ADATSA funded.

  • Differential Diagnosis Treatment - A specialized program of substance abuse and mental health diagnosis and treatment. Limited to 30 days.
  • Extended Care Treatment - For clients needing prolonged treatment services. Some of these have a maximum stay of 90 days, and some have a maximum stay of 180 days.
  • Intensive Inpatient Treatment - A concentrated residential program. May only exceed 30 days by exception to policy (ETP).
  • Recovery House - Provides care and treatment to aid in adjustment to abstinence, re-entering the community, and seeking employment. Limited to 60 days per admission.

adolescent - Funded by DBHR directly to the provider - No ADATSA

  • Level One Youth Basic Residential - For ages 13 - 17 who evidence cognitive ability of at least 11 years of age, have primary diagnosis of chemical dependency, and require less clinical supervision and behavior management. Ages 12 and younger and 18-20 may be served with clinical assessment by a Chemical Dependency Professional (CDP) of appropriateness for youth.
  • Level Two Youth Intensive Residential Treatment - For those age 13 - 17 who meet the criteria for being both chemically dependent and with the symptoms of mental health diagnosis (or potential diagnosis requiring concurrent management with the treatment of addiction (e.g., ADH disorder, depression, conduct disorder, etc.) and/or extreme family dysfunction, prior trauma due to emotional, physical, and/or sexual abuse, which may present a major risk of danger to the client and/or others, and high risk not to complete treatment. Ages 12 and younger and 18 - 20 may be served with clinical assessment of appropriateness for youth treatment.
  • Youth Recovery House - For ages 13 - 17 who have completed residential chemical dependency treatment and who cannot immediately live with their legal guardians, parents, foster parents, or relatives, or other out-of-home placement. Ages 18 - 20 may be served with clinical appropriateness for youth treatment as determined by a CDC. Those from Level 1 and from Level 2 residential may be served.

recovery house - see residential treatment (adult and adolescent).

refusal skills/relapse prevention - A variety of practical, everyday individual approaches, and skills that are "How to's" for staying clean and sober.

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screening - A provider of treatment services organizes an inter-agency team to screen and approve youth for the case management services.

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TAMARC - The Adult Model of Addiction Recovery Counseling.

TANF - (see Work First). Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (a.k.a. Work First) The federal government passed this act, which replaces AFDC (Aid to Families with Dependent Children). Washington State's model for initiating this welfare to work program is called Work First. TANF/Work First clients receive chemical dependency assessments and referral to treatment services through out-stationed chemical dependence professionals at the CSO.

TASC - Treatment Alternatives for Safer Communities.

Title XVI - Is the Federal welfare program that authorizes SSI (money) for the aged, blind and disabled.

Title XIX - Is the Federal welfare program that authorizes Medicaid (medical) for families, children, aged, blind and disabled.

transportation and Family Hardship Funding - Intended to assist families of youth who are clients in DBHR - funded, residential chemical dependency treatment programs and youth detoxification services. Assists families with travel and lodging costs to enable them to fully participate in the family treatment program.

transitional housing (pregnant, parenting, postpartum) - Independent living in low-income housing.

treatment focus - When the focus of treatment is intended to serve a particular group of people.

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women's services - Services that are provided to women only.

Work First - (see TANF). Families and custodial parents that receive cash assistance, and have children ages 16 years and older are required to participate. These welfare cash benefits are limited to a five-year lifetime total for adults. The CSO staff is the source of Work First referrals.

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youth - Youth are those who are age 12-17 years.

youth detoxification/crisis stabilization - (see detoxification). For ages 13 -17. Provides a safe, temporary, protective envirorunent for at-risk/runaway youth who are experiencing harmful effects of intoxication and/or withdrawal from alcohol and other drugs, in conjunction with emotional and behavioral crisis, including co-existing or undetermined mental health symptomatology. Those of ages 12 or less, and 18 or over may be served based on clinical need and availability of age-appropriate services.

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Clark County Community Services: Vanessa R. Gaston, Director
Street address: 1601 East Fourth Plain Boulevard, Suite C214, Vancouver, WA 98661
Mailing address: P.O. Box 5000, Vancouver, WA 98666-9810
Main phone: (360) 397-2130 | FAX: (360) 397-6028
E-mail: Community.Services@clark.wa.gov
Community Services Fraud and Abuse Hotline
The Fraud and Abuse Hotline number is (360) 397-8030 and is for the reporting of suspected fraud or abuse related to payment for services. Messages may be left anonymously. To speak directly with the Department Compliance Officer, call (360) 397-2075 ext. 7840.
Responsible Elected Official: Board of Clark County Commissioners

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