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Juvenile Courts > Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

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  1. What are the Detention Center visiting hours?
  2. How are visits arranged?
  3. Who may visit youth who are being detained?
  4. Is there a charge to parents when a youth is in detention?
  5. What time and on what days is court held?
  6. What if I don't come to court as ordered?
  7. What should I wear to court?
  8. Can the public attend trials?
  9. What is diversion?
  10. Is there a fee for diversion services?
  11. What happens to the most serious offenders?
  12. Are juvenile records confidential?
  13. Can the record of criminal offenses one commits as a juvenile be destroyed?
  14. Can criminal records of offenses committed while a juvenile be sealed?
  15. Are parents liable for damages or injury caused by their children?
  16. Are the crews seen picking up litter along highways and on community grounds made up of juvenile offenders?
  17. Where do I get help for a child that runs away or won't follow rules of the home?

1. What are the Detention Center visiting hours?

Visitation is scheduled twice a week for each youth and each visit lasts approximately 25 minutes. The visitation day and time is based on the living unit the unit is assigned to.

A-Pod

Tuesday--7pm, Saturday--330pm

B-Pod

Monday--7pm, Saturday--130pm

C-Pod

Wednesday--7pm. Sunday--130pm

D-Pod Thursday--7pm, Sunday--330pm

 

2. How are visits arranged?

Visitation is scheduled and communicated to parents and guardians upon a youth's admission into Detention. Parents are encouraged to arrive 15 minutes prior to the scheduled visitation time. These visits occur during business hours. Parents/Guardians that are unsure of the time should call the child's assigned Probation Counselor or Detention.

  • Probation Counselors: (360) 397-2201
  • Detention: (360) 397-2450

3. Who may visit youth who are being detained?

Visitation is restricted to parents and guardians only. Special visits that involve other family members must be arranged with the youth's Probation Counselor. If unauthorized individuals come for visitation they will not be allowed to participate in a visitation.

4. Is there a charge to parents when a youth is in detention?

Yes, in most cases, the charge is $40 per day.

5. What time and on what days is court held?

Monday through Friday: beginning at 9 a.m.
These sessions generally finish before noon, but may extend into the afternoon if there is a large docket (list of cases to be heard). Trials may be set at other times. Non-criminal juvenile cases are heard on Monday and Tuesday afternoons.

6. What if I don't come to court as ordered?

If you fail to appear, or fail to have an attorney appear for you, a warrant will be issued for your arrest.

7. What should I wear to court?

You should try to look your best for court. No halter tops, tank tops, shorts, or hats are to be worn in the courtroom. Pants worn below the waist should also not be worn. It is in your best interest to be properly dressed. The judge can order you to leave the courtroom if you are inappropriately dressed.

8. Can the public attend trials?

Yes, you can attend any criminal trial but seating is limited.

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9. What is diversion?

Diversion is the process of dealing with offenses outside of the courtroom. The ultimate goal of diversion is to hold youth accountable for their actions while giving the youth an opportunity not to have a permanent record. This process is usually for first-time misdemeanor offenders.

10. Is there a fee for diversion services?

Yes, it is $75, $100, and $125 depending on the referral.

11. What happens to the most serious offenders?

They may be committed to an institution operated by the state Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration (JRA) or transferred to adult court. JRA institutions are located outside of Clark County.

12. Are juvenile records confidential?

Diversion records are, but offender court adjudication records are not unless they are sealed by court order.

13. Can the record of criminal offenses one commits as a juvenile be destroyed?

See: Sealing and Destroying Records

Only in diverted cases. If a youth has only one referral or diversion (see explanation of diversion), and all terms of the diversion have been successfully completed, the record can be destroyed after two years and the youth is 18 years of age. If the record consists of more than one referral, but all are diversions that have been successfully completed, the record can be destroyed at age 23. Records of a criminal offense that was adjudicated (it went through court) cannot be destroyed.

14. Can criminal records of offenses committed while a juvenile be sealed?

See: Sealing and Destroying Records

Adjudicated records can be "sealed". This means the criminal record is no longer available to the public. To have one's records sealed one must be at least 18 years old and have fulfilled a specified number of consecutive years in the community without committing any offense or crime that results in a conviction. The number of crime-free years is measured from the last date of release from confinement, including full-time residential treatment. If the adjudicated offense was a misdemeanor the time period is two consecutive years. For a Class B felony other than sex offenses, 10 consecutive years. For a Class C felony other than sex offenses, 5 consecutive years.

15. Are parents liable for damages or injury caused by their children?

In many cases yes. Under state law victims or insurance companies can seek damages from parents by filing a civil lawsuit. There is no maximum limit on the amount that can be sought through a civil lawsuit.

16. Are the crews seen picking up litter along highways and on community grounds made up of juvenile offenders?

The Juvenile Court no longer uses work crews. You may see juveniles on work crews from the District Court. Work crews are more commonly used with adult offenders. The Juvenile Court seeks to connect young offenders with community service opportunities that enable them to work along side community members as they fulfill their obligation to give service to the community. If youth from the Juvenile Court are picking up litter, it will be side by side with community volunteers on a specific project like "Earth Day" or a neighborhood clean-up project.

17. Where do I get help for a child that runs away or won't follow rules of the home?

Visit the Clark County Mental Health Providers website for more information of what's available in the community.

The Department of Children and Family Services can also be contacted at (360) 993-7903.

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Clark County Juvenile Court Administrator: Pat Escamilla
Street Address: 500 West 11th Street, Vancouver, WA 98660
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 5000, Vancouver, WA 98666-5000
Main phone: (360) 397-2201 | FAX: (360) 397-6109
Telecommunications Relay Service: (800) 833-6388, then call (360) 397-2445
E-mail: Pat.escamilla@clark.wa.gov

Responsible Elected Official: Presiding Judge Barbara D. Johnson

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